The Aviation Connection

Multi-rotor Aircraft - Fad or Future?

Ohio-based American Workhorse Group is a relative newcomer to the motor vehicle manufacturing business. It has been producing a range of commercial vehicles in the US since 1998 and new electrically powered commercial vehicles since 2015. While Workhorse’s trucks and vans are perhaps some of the ugliest looking to hit the roads anywhere in the world since the creations of Eastern Bloc austerity, its newest electric pick-up truck (with the unimaginatively dull yet appropriate name of “W-15”) is possibly a contender for the title of “World’s Ugliest”.

Just Focus on the Flying

If you are involved with Helicopter Air Ambulances (HAA’s) in the USA there is a whole lot more to think about now. At the end of April an amendment to Part 135 (Subpart L—Helicopter Air Ambulance Equipment, Operations, and Training Requirements) came into force.

The Real Benefits of Onboard Connectivity

You’d have to look hard nowadays to find someone who isn’t regularly using WiFi or Bluetooth in everyday life—beyond the confines of a retirement home. Nevertheless, despite their prevalence everywhere else, they are still not yet commonplace for airborne operations.

Welcoming WiFi and Bluetooth Onboard

At Heli-Expo we announced two highly desirable new features for the Flightcell DZMx. From July this year we will ship the first DZMx units with built in WiFi and Bluetooth capabilities. Both capabilities will be optional enhancements.

Communication Technology to Save Lives

A DZMx Story
Imagine you are out hiking in the mountains with a friend—many hours’ walk from the nearest civilisation—when the pain first strikes you. Your shortness of breath is more exaggerated than it should be as your chest tightens in agony and debilitating pain radiates through your neck and into your arm. Nausea overcomes you and despite your exertion, your skin feels cold and clammy and you collapse and struggle to stay conscious.

Maximising the Life of your Turbine Engine

In recent years, increasing numbers of aircraft operators have realised the value—both in safety and economic terms—of using electronic monitoring systems to record a variety of engine and transmission health and performance parameters. Recording this data and monitoring it on a regular basis, enables smaller operators to prolong the life of vital (and unavoidably expensive) mechanical components in the same way that airlines use electronic monitoring of engines (and other systems) as a matter of course to protect their multi-billion dollar fleets of aircraft.

The Right Stuff?

Few aviators are unfamiliar with the 1983 movie The Right Stuff. As its title suggests, it implies that the “right” personality traits for a (1950s) test pilot were gung-ho personal courage and an occasional disregard for rules and procedures in order to get the job done. With test pilots being killed at a rate of about one a week in the 1950s, perhaps the film title should have been punctuated with a question mark.

Automated Rescue Monitoring (A.R.M)

It's as simple as a press of a button but it has critical implications. Picture this scenario; something has gone terribly wrong in-flight, its happened in a split-second and you realise you have to make a forced landing. You are so occupied with what's unfolding you don't have time, or you don't even think, about sending an emergency message.

ADS-B Tracking Implications

ADS-B is being rolled out worldwide and it's providing greater situational awareness, traffic avoidance and improved ATC clearances. And with it comes accurate high frequency tracking. So, does that mean your existing satellite or cellular tracking equipment may well be redundant? Or maybe it should no longer be on your shopping list?

Heli-Expo 2017

Heli-Expo is a stunning showcase of the rotorcaft industry with a host of aircraft on display, new aircraft launches and glimpses into the future of the industry. This year it’s predicted that over 20,000 people will go through the doors of the Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center in Dallas, Texas.